Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

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Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

Post by KC_ » Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 pm

“Why aren't they being arrested? “

Well one of them was for wearing a bandanna over her face.

'The civil rights march of my life': Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

USA TODAY
Ryan W. Miller and John Bacon, USA TODAY
USA TODAYJanuary 20, 2020

Virginia declares state of emergency ahead of gun rally
RICHMOND, Va. – Thousands of gun owners and gun rights supporters gathered Monday at Virginia's Capitol for a "peaceful day to address our Legislature" that appeared to generate none of the violence feared by some state leaders.

Many demonstrators, opposed to proposed gun restrictions, openly displayed military-style semiautomatic rifles. Other wore orange “Guns save lives” stickers as the crowd chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem. Signs read “Come and take it” and “Second Amendment Sanctuary.”

But despite warnings from Gov. Ralph Northam and law enforcement that out-of-state hate groups and militias may incite violence, the protest did not grow heated. Police estimated the size of the crowd at 22,000 – including 6,000 people inside Capitol Square – and only one arrest was reported.

Police said Mikaela E. Beschler, 21, of Richmond, was charged with one felony count of wearing a mask in public after being warned twice before against wearing a bandanna covering her face. Beschler was released on her recognizance.

Demonstrator Matthew French, 40, from Bland, called the rally a success and said he hoped the large, peaceful crowd would help sway legislators.

“The sheer numbers here speaks for itself,” he said. “I hope our legislators will back off. Today was the civil rights march of my life."

Tom Rohde, 49, of West Point, said he was happy to see no violence.

“You got thousands of guns and not a single bullet fired,” he said.

Earlier, a heavy police presence greeted rally goers calmly lining up to enter the state Capitol, where they had to pass through a security checkpoint.

Connie Stanley, 58, from Aylett, came to the rally with a group of women. She sees owning a gun and the Second Amendment as a security issue. She said where she lives, it could take police too long to respond if she calls 911.

“As a woman, I feel like it’s about protection,” she said.

Northam declared a state of emergency Friday through Tuesday, banning all weapons, including firearms, in the square around the Capitol building. He said law enforcement received “credible” threats of violence from out-of-state hate groups and militias.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

At least six suspected members of a violent neo-Nazi group were arrested last week in Maryland and Georgia. Authorities feared three of the men planned to try to incite violence at the rally.

On Monday, law enforcement helicopters buzzed overhead as state, city and Capitol police kept a wary eye on the crowds. Barricades lined the streets and many shops were closed.

Demonstrator Brantley Overby, 22, came armed to Richmond from Henderson, North Carolina. He said whenever there’s a large group like the one here, carrying a firearm is about safety.

“It’s a sense of security,” he said of having a gun. “If something happens, you have the option to use it.”

Virginia gun rally: What's behind the battle over gun control

He said he came to Virginia because he fears similar laws could pass in North Carolina and around the U.S.

“This is the first attack on the Second Amendment I’ve seen in a long time.”

Tim Hunter, 45, from Richmond, said the Second Amendment is important to veterans like him. He served in Desert Storm in the Army

“There’s a reason it’s number two on the list,” he said.

Hunter was inside Capitol Square, where tight security and fences lined the perimeter.

Hunter and everyone else inside the grounds “willfully decided to leave our weapons at home,” he said. “If we come out here as an armed mob, nobody is going to listen.”

While more than a thousand gathered inside the grounds, many more were outside rallying. Flags bearing President Donald Trump’s name and “don’t tread on me” poked up above the crowd as the smaller crowd inside the Capitol grounds watched. “We will not comply,” the large crowd outside the gates chanted.

The day was planned as a “lobby day” by the Virginia Citizens Defense League, which has organized similar events to advocate for gun rights for years. A mass movement grew out of the scheduled protest this year, however, drawing interest from people who had “malicious plans" for the rally, Northam said.

Authorities were determined to ensure that the rally didn't spark chaos that marked a 2017 white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Clashes broke out at the “Unite the Right” rally, and a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd, killing a counter protester. Some of the militia groups that said they would attend the rally in Richmond are the same ones that attended that rally, the Daily Beast reported.

“No one wants another incident like the one we saw at Charlottesville," Northam said. "
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Re: Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

Post by Chester Cheesewright » Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:51 pm

KC_ wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 pm
“Why aren't they being arrested? “

Well one of them was for wearing a bandanna over her face.

'The civil rights march of my life': Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

USA TODAY
Ryan W. Miller and John Bacon, USA TODAY
USA TODAYJanuary 20, 2020

Virginia declares state of emergency ahead of gun rally
RICHMOND, Va. – Thousands of gun owners and gun rights supporters gathered Monday at Virginia's Capitol for a "peaceful day to address our Legislature" that appeared to generate none of the violence feared by some state leaders.

Many demonstrators, opposed to proposed gun restrictions, openly displayed military-style semiautomatic rifles. Other wore orange “Guns save lives” stickers as the crowd chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem. Signs read “Come and take it” and “Second Amendment Sanctuary.”

But despite warnings from Gov. Ralph Northam and law enforcement that out-of-state hate groups and militias may incite violence, the protest did not grow heated. Police estimated the size of the crowd at 22,000 – including 6,000 people inside Capitol Square – and only one arrest was reported.

Police said Mikaela E. Beschler, 21, of Richmond, was charged with one felony count of wearing a mask in public after being warned twice before against wearing a bandanna covering her face. Beschler was released on her recognizance.

Demonstrator Matthew French, 40, from Bland, called the rally a success and said he hoped the large, peaceful crowd would help sway legislators.

“The sheer numbers here speaks for itself,” he said. “I hope our legislators will back off. Today was the civil rights march of my life."

Tom Rohde, 49, of West Point, said he was happy to see no violence.

“You got thousands of guns and not a single bullet fired,” he said.

Earlier, a heavy police presence greeted rally goers calmly lining up to enter the state Capitol, where they had to pass through a security checkpoint.

Connie Stanley, 58, from Aylett, came to the rally with a group of women. She sees owning a gun and the Second Amendment as a security issue. She said where she lives, it could take police too long to respond if she calls 911.

“As a woman, I feel like it’s about protection,” she said.

Northam declared a state of emergency Friday through Tuesday, banning all weapons, including firearms, in the square around the Capitol building. He said law enforcement received “credible” threats of violence from out-of-state hate groups and militias.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

At least six suspected members of a violent neo-Nazi group were arrested last week in Maryland and Georgia. Authorities feared three of the men planned to try to incite violence at the rally.

On Monday, law enforcement helicopters buzzed overhead as state, city and Capitol police kept a wary eye on the crowds. Barricades lined the streets and many shops were closed.

Demonstrator Brantley Overby, 22, came armed to Richmond from Henderson, North Carolina. He said whenever there’s a large group like the one here, carrying a firearm is about safety.

“It’s a sense of security,” he said of having a gun. “If something happens, you have the option to use it.”

Virginia gun rally: What's behind the battle over gun control

He said he came to Virginia because he fears similar laws could pass in North Carolina and around the U.S.

“This is the first attack on the Second Amendment I’ve seen in a long time.”

Tim Hunter, 45, from Richmond, said the Second Amendment is important to veterans like him. He served in Desert Storm in the Army

“There’s a reason it’s number two on the list,” he said.

Hunter was inside Capitol Square, where tight security and fences lined the perimeter.

Hunter and everyone else inside the grounds “willfully decided to leave our weapons at home,” he said. “If we come out here as an armed mob, nobody is going to listen.”

While more than a thousand gathered inside the grounds, many more were outside rallying. Flags bearing President Donald Trump’s name and “don’t tread on me” poked up above the crowd as the smaller crowd inside the Capitol grounds watched. “We will not comply,” the large crowd outside the gates chanted.

The day was planned as a “lobby day” by the Virginia Citizens Defense League, which has organized similar events to advocate for gun rights for years. A mass movement grew out of the scheduled protest this year, however, drawing interest from people who had “malicious plans" for the rally, Northam said.

Authorities were determined to ensure that the rally didn't spark chaos that marked a 2017 white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Clashes broke out at the “Unite the Right” rally, and a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd, killing a counter protester. Some of the militia groups that said they would attend the rally in Richmond are the same ones that attended that rally, the Daily Beast reported.

“No one wants another incident like the one we saw at Charlottesville," Northam said. "
► That's all well and good, but who knows why we need it

Some were carrying a Texas flag with an AR-15 on it. That's some ugly $#@% if you ask me,
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Re: Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

Post by barrysoetoro » Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:56 pm

KC_ wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 pm
“Why aren't they being arrested? “

Well one of them was for wearing a bandanna over her face.

'The civil rights march of my life': Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

USA TODAY
Ryan W. Miller and John Bacon, USA TODAY
USA TODAYJanuary 20, 2020

Virginia declares state of emergency ahead of gun rally
RICHMOND, Va. – Thousands of gun owners and gun rights supporters gathered Monday at Virginia's Capitol for a "peaceful day to address our Legislature" that appeared to generate none of the violence feared by some state leaders.

Many demonstrators, opposed to proposed gun restrictions, openly displayed military-style semiautomatic rifles. Other wore orange “Guns save lives” stickers as the crowd chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem. Signs read “Come and take it” and “Second Amendment Sanctuary.”

But despite warnings from Gov. Ralph Northam and law enforcement that out-of-state hate groups and militias may incite violence, the protest did not grow heated. Police estimated the size of the crowd at 22,000 – including 6,000 people inside Capitol Square – and only one arrest was reported.

Police said Mikaela E. Beschler, 21, of Richmond, was charged with one felony count of wearing a mask in public after being warned twice before against wearing a bandanna covering her face. Beschler was released on her recognizance.

Demonstrator Matthew French, 40, from Bland, called the rally a success and said he hoped the large, peaceful crowd would help sway legislators.

“The sheer numbers here speaks for itself,” he said. “I hope our legislators will back off. Today was the civil rights march of my life."

Tom Rohde, 49, of West Point, said he was happy to see no violence.

“You got thousands of guns and not a single bullet fired,” he said.

Earlier, a heavy police presence greeted rally goers calmly lining up to enter the state Capitol, where they had to pass through a security checkpoint.

Connie Stanley, 58, from Aylett, came to the rally with a group of women. She sees owning a gun and the Second Amendment as a security issue. She said where she lives, it could take police too long to respond if she calls 911.

“As a woman, I feel like it’s about protection,” she said.

Northam declared a state of emergency Friday through Tuesday, banning all weapons, including firearms, in the square around the Capitol building. He said law enforcement received “credible” threats of violence from out-of-state hate groups and militias.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

At least six suspected members of a violent neo-Nazi group were arrested last week in Maryland and Georgia. Authorities feared three of the men planned to try to incite violence at the rally.

On Monday, law enforcement helicopters buzzed overhead as state, city and Capitol police kept a wary eye on the crowds. Barricades lined the streets and many shops were closed.

Demonstrator Brantley Overby, 22, came armed to Richmond from Henderson, North Carolina. He said whenever there’s a large group like the one here, carrying a firearm is about safety.

“It’s a sense of security,” he said of having a gun. “If something happens, you have the option to use it.”

Virginia gun rally: What's behind the battle over gun control

He said he came to Virginia because he fears similar laws could pass in North Carolina and around the U.S.

“This is the first attack on the Second Amendment I’ve seen in a long time.”

Tim Hunter, 45, from Richmond, said the Second Amendment is important to veterans like him. He served in Desert Storm in the Army

“There’s a reason it’s number two on the list,” he said.

Hunter was inside Capitol Square, where tight security and fences lined the perimeter.

Hunter and everyone else inside the grounds “willfully decided to leave our weapons at home,” he said. “If we come out here as an armed mob, nobody is going to listen.”

While more than a thousand gathered inside the grounds, many more were outside rallying. Flags bearing President Donald Trump’s name and “don’t tread on me” poked up above the crowd as the smaller crowd inside the Capitol grounds watched. “We will not comply,” the large crowd outside the gates chanted.

The day was planned as a “lobby day” by the Virginia Citizens Defense League, which has organized similar events to advocate for gun rights for years. A mass movement grew out of the scheduled protest this year, however, drawing interest from people who had “malicious plans" for the rally, Northam said.

Authorities were determined to ensure that the rally didn't spark chaos that marked a 2017 white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Clashes broke out at the “Unite the Right” rally, and a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd, killing a counter protester. Some of the militia groups that said they would attend the rally in Richmond are the same ones that attended that rally, the Daily Beast reported.

“No one wants another incident like the one we saw at Charlottesville," Northam said. "
YOUR BUDDY EVIL SURE GOT TRIGGERED, THINKING EVERYONE BROKE THE LAW WHEN HIS OWN ARTICLE SAID NO.
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Re: Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

Post by barrysoetoro » Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:58 pm

Chester Cheesewright wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:51 pm
KC_ wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 pm
“Why aren't they being arrested? “

Well one of them was for wearing a bandanna over her face.

'The civil rights march of my life': Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

USA TODAY
Ryan W. Miller and John Bacon, USA TODAY
USA TODAYJanuary 20, 2020

Virginia declares state of emergency ahead of gun rally
RICHMOND, Va. – Thousands of gun owners and gun rights supporters gathered Monday at Virginia's Capitol for a "peaceful day to address our Legislature" that appeared to generate none of the violence feared by some state leaders.

Many demonstrators, opposed to proposed gun restrictions, openly displayed military-style semiautomatic rifles. Other wore orange “Guns save lives” stickers as the crowd chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem. Signs read “Come and take it” and “Second Amendment Sanctuary.”

But despite warnings from Gov. Ralph Northam and law enforcement that out-of-state hate groups and militias may incite violence, the protest did not grow heated. Police estimated the size of the crowd at 22,000 – including 6,000 people inside Capitol Square – and only one arrest was reported.

Police said Mikaela E. Beschler, 21, of Richmond, was charged with one felony count of wearing a mask in public after being warned twice before against wearing a bandanna covering her face. Beschler was released on her recognizance.

Demonstrator Matthew French, 40, from Bland, called the rally a success and said he hoped the large, peaceful crowd would help sway legislators.

“The sheer numbers here speaks for itself,” he said. “I hope our legislators will back off. Today was the civil rights march of my life."

Tom Rohde, 49, of West Point, said he was happy to see no violence.

“You got thousands of guns and not a single bullet fired,” he said.

Earlier, a heavy police presence greeted rally goers calmly lining up to enter the state Capitol, where they had to pass through a security checkpoint.

Connie Stanley, 58, from Aylett, came to the rally with a group of women. She sees owning a gun and the Second Amendment as a security issue. She said where she lives, it could take police too long to respond if she calls 911.

“As a woman, I feel like it’s about protection,” she said.

Northam declared a state of emergency Friday through Tuesday, banning all weapons, including firearms, in the square around the Capitol building. He said law enforcement received “credible” threats of violence from out-of-state hate groups and militias.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

At least six suspected members of a violent neo-Nazi group were arrested last week in Maryland and Georgia. Authorities feared three of the men planned to try to incite violence at the rally.

On Monday, law enforcement helicopters buzzed overhead as state, city and Capitol police kept a wary eye on the crowds. Barricades lined the streets and many shops were closed.

Demonstrator Brantley Overby, 22, came armed to Richmond from Henderson, North Carolina. He said whenever there’s a large group like the one here, carrying a firearm is about safety.

“It’s a sense of security,” he said of having a gun. “If something happens, you have the option to use it.”

Virginia gun rally: What's behind the battle over gun control

He said he came to Virginia because he fears similar laws could pass in North Carolina and around the U.S.

“This is the first attack on the Second Amendment I’ve seen in a long time.”

Tim Hunter, 45, from Richmond, said the Second Amendment is important to veterans like him. He served in Desert Storm in the Army

“There’s a reason it’s number two on the list,” he said.

Hunter was inside Capitol Square, where tight security and fences lined the perimeter.

Hunter and everyone else inside the grounds “willfully decided to leave our weapons at home,” he said. “If we come out here as an armed mob, nobody is going to listen.”

While more than a thousand gathered inside the grounds, many more were outside rallying. Flags bearing President Donald Trump’s name and “don’t tread on me” poked up above the crowd as the smaller crowd inside the Capitol grounds watched. “We will not comply,” the large crowd outside the gates chanted.

The day was planned as a “lobby day” by the Virginia Citizens Defense League, which has organized similar events to advocate for gun rights for years. A mass movement grew out of the scheduled protest this year, however, drawing interest from people who had “malicious plans" for the rally, Northam said.

Authorities were determined to ensure that the rally didn't spark chaos that marked a 2017 white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Clashes broke out at the “Unite the Right” rally, and a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd, killing a counter protester. Some of the militia groups that said they would attend the rally in Richmond are the same ones that attended that rally, the Daily Beast reported.

“No one wants another incident like the one we saw at Charlottesville," Northam said. "
► That's all well and good, but who knows why we need it

Some were carrying a Texas flag with an AR-15 on it. That's some ugly scheiße if you ask me,
What did you carry? A communist flag, and your tax forms? Or a switchblade that brown scum carry.
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Re: Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

Post by Chester Cheesewright » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:03 pm

barrysoetoro wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:58 pm
Chester Cheesewright wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:51 pm
KC_ wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 pm
“Why aren't they being arrested? “

Well one of them was for wearing a bandanna over her face.

'The civil rights march of my life': Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

USA TODAY
Ryan W. Miller and John Bacon, USA TODAY
USA TODAYJanuary 20, 2020

Virginia declares state of emergency ahead of gun rally
RICHMOND, Va. – Thousands of gun owners and gun rights supporters gathered Monday at Virginia's Capitol for a "peaceful day to address our Legislature" that appeared to generate none of the violence feared by some state leaders.

Many demonstrators, opposed to proposed gun restrictions, openly displayed military-style semiautomatic rifles. Other wore orange “Guns save lives” stickers as the crowd chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem. Signs read “Come and take it” and “Second Amendment Sanctuary.”

But despite warnings from Gov. Ralph Northam and law enforcement that out-of-state hate groups and militias may incite violence, the protest did not grow heated. Police estimated the size of the crowd at 22,000 – including 6,000 people inside Capitol Square – and only one arrest was reported.

Police said Mikaela E. Beschler, 21, of Richmond, was charged with one felony count of wearing a mask in public after being warned twice before against wearing a bandanna covering her face. Beschler was released on her recognizance.

Demonstrator Matthew French, 40, from Bland, called the rally a success and said he hoped the large, peaceful crowd would help sway legislators.

“The sheer numbers here speaks for itself,” he said. “I hope our legislators will back off. Today was the civil rights march of my life."

Tom Rohde, 49, of West Point, said he was happy to see no violence.

“You got thousands of guns and not a single bullet fired,” he said.

Earlier, a heavy police presence greeted rally goers calmly lining up to enter the state Capitol, where they had to pass through a security checkpoint.

Connie Stanley, 58, from Aylett, came to the rally with a group of women. She sees owning a gun and the Second Amendment as a security issue. She said where she lives, it could take police too long to respond if she calls 911.

“As a woman, I feel like it’s about protection,” she said.

Northam declared a state of emergency Friday through Tuesday, banning all weapons, including firearms, in the square around the Capitol building. He said law enforcement received “credible” threats of violence from out-of-state hate groups and militias.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

At least six suspected members of a violent neo-Nazi group were arrested last week in Maryland and Georgia. Authorities feared three of the men planned to try to incite violence at the rally.

On Monday, law enforcement helicopters buzzed overhead as state, city and Capitol police kept a wary eye on the crowds. Barricades lined the streets and many shops were closed.

Demonstrator Brantley Overby, 22, came armed to Richmond from Henderson, North Carolina. He said whenever there’s a large group like the one here, carrying a firearm is about safety.

“It’s a sense of security,” he said of having a gun. “If something happens, you have the option to use it.”

Virginia gun rally: What's behind the battle over gun control

He said he came to Virginia because he fears similar laws could pass in North Carolina and around the U.S.

“This is the first attack on the Second Amendment I’ve seen in a long time.”

Tim Hunter, 45, from Richmond, said the Second Amendment is important to veterans like him. He served in Desert Storm in the Army

“There’s a reason it’s number two on the list,” he said.

Hunter was inside Capitol Square, where tight security and fences lined the perimeter.

Hunter and everyone else inside the grounds “willfully decided to leave our weapons at home,” he said. “If we come out here as an armed mob, nobody is going to listen.”

While more than a thousand gathered inside the grounds, many more were outside rallying. Flags bearing President Donald Trump’s name and “don’t tread on me” poked up above the crowd as the smaller crowd inside the Capitol grounds watched. “We will not comply,” the large crowd outside the gates chanted.

The day was planned as a “lobby day” by the Virginia Citizens Defense League, which has organized similar events to advocate for gun rights for years. A mass movement grew out of the scheduled protest this year, however, drawing interest from people who had “malicious plans" for the rally, Northam said.

Authorities were determined to ensure that the rally didn't spark chaos that marked a 2017 white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Clashes broke out at the “Unite the Right” rally, and a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd, killing a counter protester. Some of the militia groups that said they would attend the rally in Richmond are the same ones that attended that rally, the Daily Beast reported.

“No one wants another incident like the one we saw at Charlottesville," Northam said. "
► That's all well and good, but who knows why we need it

Some were carrying a Texas flag with an AR-15 on it. That's some ugly scheiße if you ask me,
What did you carry? A communist flag, and your tax forms? Or a switchblade that brown scum carry.
► Well, your favorite student from MSD High is the one you never complain about
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Re: Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

Post by barrysoetoro » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:10 pm

Chester Cheesewright wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:03 pm
barrysoetoro wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:58 pm
Chester Cheesewright wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:51 pm
KC_ wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 pm
“Why aren't they being arrested? “

Well one of them was for wearing a bandanna over her face.

'The civil rights march of my life': Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

USA TODAY
Ryan W. Miller and John Bacon, USA TODAY
USA TODAYJanuary 20, 2020

Virginia declares state of emergency ahead of gun rally
RICHMOND, Va. – Thousands of gun owners and gun rights supporters gathered Monday at Virginia's Capitol for a "peaceful day to address our Legislature" that appeared to generate none of the violence feared by some state leaders.

Many demonstrators, opposed to proposed gun restrictions, openly displayed military-style semiautomatic rifles. Other wore orange “Guns save lives” stickers as the crowd chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem. Signs read “Come and take it” and “Second Amendment Sanctuary.”

But despite warnings from Gov. Ralph Northam and law enforcement that out-of-state hate groups and militias may incite violence, the protest did not grow heated. Police estimated the size of the crowd at 22,000 – including 6,000 people inside Capitol Square – and only one arrest was reported.

Police said Mikaela E. Beschler, 21, of Richmond, was charged with one felony count of wearing a mask in public after being warned twice before against wearing a bandanna covering her face. Beschler was released on her recognizance.

Demonstrator Matthew French, 40, from Bland, called the rally a success and said he hoped the large, peaceful crowd would help sway legislators.

“The sheer numbers here speaks for itself,” he said. “I hope our legislators will back off. Today was the civil rights march of my life."

Tom Rohde, 49, of West Point, said he was happy to see no violence.

“You got thousands of guns and not a single bullet fired,” he said.

Earlier, a heavy police presence greeted rally goers calmly lining up to enter the state Capitol, where they had to pass through a security checkpoint.

Connie Stanley, 58, from Aylett, came to the rally with a group of women. She sees owning a gun and the Second Amendment as a security issue. She said where she lives, it could take police too long to respond if she calls 911.

“As a woman, I feel like it’s about protection,” she said.

Northam declared a state of emergency Friday through Tuesday, banning all weapons, including firearms, in the square around the Capitol building. He said law enforcement received “credible” threats of violence from out-of-state hate groups and militias.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

At least six suspected members of a violent neo-Nazi group were arrested last week in Maryland and Georgia. Authorities feared three of the men planned to try to incite violence at the rally.

On Monday, law enforcement helicopters buzzed overhead as state, city and Capitol police kept a wary eye on the crowds. Barricades lined the streets and many shops were closed.

Demonstrator Brantley Overby, 22, came armed to Richmond from Henderson, North Carolina. He said whenever there’s a large group like the one here, carrying a firearm is about safety.

“It’s a sense of security,” he said of having a gun. “If something happens, you have the option to use it.”

Virginia gun rally: What's behind the battle over gun control

He said he came to Virginia because he fears similar laws could pass in North Carolina and around the U.S.

“This is the first attack on the Second Amendment I’ve seen in a long time.”

Tim Hunter, 45, from Richmond, said the Second Amendment is important to veterans like him. He served in Desert Storm in the Army

“There’s a reason it’s number two on the list,” he said.

Hunter was inside Capitol Square, where tight security and fences lined the perimeter.

Hunter and everyone else inside the grounds “willfully decided to leave our weapons at home,” he said. “If we come out here as an armed mob, nobody is going to listen.”

While more than a thousand gathered inside the grounds, many more were outside rallying. Flags bearing President Donald Trump’s name and “don’t tread on me” poked up above the crowd as the smaller crowd inside the Capitol grounds watched. “We will not comply,” the large crowd outside the gates chanted.

The day was planned as a “lobby day” by the Virginia Citizens Defense League, which has organized similar events to advocate for gun rights for years. A mass movement grew out of the scheduled protest this year, however, drawing interest from people who had “malicious plans" for the rally, Northam said.

Authorities were determined to ensure that the rally didn't spark chaos that marked a 2017 white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Clashes broke out at the “Unite the Right” rally, and a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd, killing a counter protester. Some of the militia groups that said they would attend the rally in Richmond are the same ones that attended that rally, the Daily Beast reported.

“No one wants another incident like the one we saw at Charlottesville," Northam said. "
► That's all well and good, but who knows why we need it

Some were carrying a Texas flag with an AR-15 on it. That's some ugly scheiße if you ask me,
What did you carry? A communist flag, and your tax forms? Or a switchblade that brown scum carry.
► Well, your favorite student from MSD High is the one you never complain about
What did you carry?
0 x
"Youre a good man evil dude.....". Unbef#ckinglievable.

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lust4beer
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Re: Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

Post by lust4beer » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:13 pm

KC_ wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 pm
“Why aren't they being arrested? “

Well one of them was for wearing a bandanna over her face.

'The civil rights march of my life': Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

USA TODAY
Ryan W. Miller and John Bacon, USA TODAY
USA TODAYJanuary 20, 2020

Virginia declares state of emergency ahead of gun rally
RICHMOND, Va. – Thousands of gun owners and gun rights supporters gathered Monday at Virginia's Capitol for a "peaceful day to address our Legislature" that appeared to generate none of the violence feared by some state leaders.

Many demonstrators, opposed to proposed gun restrictions, openly displayed military-style semiautomatic rifles. Other wore orange “Guns save lives” stickers as the crowd chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem. Signs read “Come and take it” and “Second Amendment Sanctuary.”

But despite warnings from Gov. Ralph Northam and law enforcement that out-of-state hate groups and militias may incite violence, the protest did not grow heated. Police estimated the size of the crowd at 22,000 – including 6,000 people inside Capitol Square – and only one arrest was reported.

Police said Mikaela E. Beschler, 21, of Richmond, was charged with one felony count of wearing a mask in public after being warned twice before against wearing a bandanna covering her face. Beschler was released on her recognizance.

Demonstrator Matthew French, 40, from Bland, called the rally a success and said he hoped the large, peaceful crowd would help sway legislators.

“The sheer numbers here speaks for itself,” he said. “I hope our legislators will back off. Today was the civil rights march of my life."

Tom Rohde, 49, of West Point, said he was happy to see no violence.

“You got thousands of guns and not a single bullet fired,” he said.

Earlier, a heavy police presence greeted rally goers calmly lining up to enter the state Capitol, where they had to pass through a security checkpoint.

Connie Stanley, 58, from Aylett, came to the rally with a group of women. She sees owning a gun and the Second Amendment as a security issue. She said where she lives, it could take police too long to respond if she calls 911.

“As a woman, I feel like it’s about protection,” she said.

Northam declared a state of emergency Friday through Tuesday, banning all weapons, including firearms, in the square around the Capitol building. He said law enforcement received “credible” threats of violence from out-of-state hate groups and militias.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

At least six suspected members of a violent neo-Nazi group were arrested last week in Maryland and Georgia. Authorities feared three of the men planned to try to incite violence at the rally.

On Monday, law enforcement helicopters buzzed overhead as state, city and Capitol police kept a wary eye on the crowds. Barricades lined the streets and many shops were closed.

Demonstrator Brantley Overby, 22, came armed to Richmond from Henderson, North Carolina. He said whenever there’s a large group like the one here, carrying a firearm is about safety.

“It’s a sense of security,” he said of having a gun. “If something happens, you have the option to use it.”

Virginia gun rally: What's behind the battle over gun control

He said he came to Virginia because he fears similar laws could pass in North Carolina and around the U.S.

“This is the first attack on the Second Amendment I’ve seen in a long time.”

Tim Hunter, 45, from Richmond, said the Second Amendment is important to veterans like him. He served in Desert Storm in the Army

“There’s a reason it’s number two on the list,” he said.

Hunter was inside Capitol Square, where tight security and fences lined the perimeter.

Hunter and everyone else inside the grounds “willfully decided to leave our weapons at home,” he said. “If we come out here as an armed mob, nobody is going to listen.”

While more than a thousand gathered inside the grounds, many more were outside rallying. Flags bearing President Donald Trump’s name and “don’t tread on me” poked up above the crowd as the smaller crowd inside the Capitol grounds watched. “We will not comply,” the large crowd outside the gates chanted.

The day was planned as a “lobby day” by the Virginia Citizens Defense League, which has organized similar events to advocate for gun rights for years. A mass movement grew out of the scheduled protest this year, however, drawing interest from people who had “malicious plans" for the rally, Northam said.

Authorities were determined to ensure that the rally didn't spark chaos that marked a 2017 white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Clashes broke out at the “Unite the Right” rally, and a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd, killing a counter protester. Some of the militia groups that said they would attend the rally in Richmond are the same ones that attended that rally, the Daily Beast reported.

“No one wants another incident like the one we saw at Charlottesville," Northam said. "
Weren’t those toy guns?
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Re: Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

Post by KC_ » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:14 pm

lust4beer wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:13 pm
KC_ wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 pm
“Why aren't they being arrested? “

Well one of them was for wearing a bandanna over her face.

'The civil rights march of my life': Thousands of pro-gun protesters, many heavily armed, rally peacefully in Richmond

USA TODAY
Ryan W. Miller and John Bacon, USA TODAY
USA TODAYJanuary 20, 2020

Virginia declares state of emergency ahead of gun rally
RICHMOND, Va. – Thousands of gun owners and gun rights supporters gathered Monday at Virginia's Capitol for a "peaceful day to address our Legislature" that appeared to generate none of the violence feared by some state leaders.

Many demonstrators, opposed to proposed gun restrictions, openly displayed military-style semiautomatic rifles. Other wore orange “Guns save lives” stickers as the crowd chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem. Signs read “Come and take it” and “Second Amendment Sanctuary.”

But despite warnings from Gov. Ralph Northam and law enforcement that out-of-state hate groups and militias may incite violence, the protest did not grow heated. Police estimated the size of the crowd at 22,000 – including 6,000 people inside Capitol Square – and only one arrest was reported.

Police said Mikaela E. Beschler, 21, of Richmond, was charged with one felony count of wearing a mask in public after being warned twice before against wearing a bandanna covering her face. Beschler was released on her recognizance.

Demonstrator Matthew French, 40, from Bland, called the rally a success and said he hoped the large, peaceful crowd would help sway legislators.

“The sheer numbers here speaks for itself,” he said. “I hope our legislators will back off. Today was the civil rights march of my life."

Tom Rohde, 49, of West Point, said he was happy to see no violence.

“You got thousands of guns and not a single bullet fired,” he said.

Earlier, a heavy police presence greeted rally goers calmly lining up to enter the state Capitol, where they had to pass through a security checkpoint.

Connie Stanley, 58, from Aylett, came to the rally with a group of women. She sees owning a gun and the Second Amendment as a security issue. She said where she lives, it could take police too long to respond if she calls 911.

“As a woman, I feel like it’s about protection,” she said.

Northam declared a state of emergency Friday through Tuesday, banning all weapons, including firearms, in the square around the Capitol building. He said law enforcement received “credible” threats of violence from out-of-state hate groups and militias.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

At least six suspected members of a violent neo-Nazi group were arrested last week in Maryland and Georgia. Authorities feared three of the men planned to try to incite violence at the rally.

On Monday, law enforcement helicopters buzzed overhead as state, city and Capitol police kept a wary eye on the crowds. Barricades lined the streets and many shops were closed.

Demonstrator Brantley Overby, 22, came armed to Richmond from Henderson, North Carolina. He said whenever there’s a large group like the one here, carrying a firearm is about safety.

“It’s a sense of security,” he said of having a gun. “If something happens, you have the option to use it.”

Virginia gun rally: What's behind the battle over gun control

He said he came to Virginia because he fears similar laws could pass in North Carolina and around the U.S.

“This is the first attack on the Second Amendment I’ve seen in a long time.”

Tim Hunter, 45, from Richmond, said the Second Amendment is important to veterans like him. He served in Desert Storm in the Army

“There’s a reason it’s number two on the list,” he said.

Hunter was inside Capitol Square, where tight security and fences lined the perimeter.

Hunter and everyone else inside the grounds “willfully decided to leave our weapons at home,” he said. “If we come out here as an armed mob, nobody is going to listen.”

While more than a thousand gathered inside the grounds, many more were outside rallying. Flags bearing President Donald Trump’s name and “don’t tread on me” poked up above the crowd as the smaller crowd inside the Capitol grounds watched. “We will not comply,” the large crowd outside the gates chanted.

The day was planned as a “lobby day” by the Virginia Citizens Defense League, which has organized similar events to advocate for gun rights for years. A mass movement grew out of the scheduled protest this year, however, drawing interest from people who had “malicious plans" for the rally, Northam said.

Authorities were determined to ensure that the rally didn't spark chaos that marked a 2017 white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Clashes broke out at the “Unite the Right” rally, and a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd, killing a counter protester. Some of the militia groups that said they would attend the rally in Richmond are the same ones that attended that rally, the Daily Beast reported.

“No one wants another incident like the one we saw at Charlottesville," Northam said. "
Weren’t those toy guns?
No that was a guy in Florida who caused a bunch of Colleges to be locked down.
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